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THEIR NAMES





This is Cho Kyuhyun. Yaaaay, Cho Kyuhyun. He calls himself Cho Gyuhyun. So does his passport. But since you guys don't pay attention when he calls himself Cao Guixian, either, I suppose it only makes sense than you'd call him Kyuhyun and not Gyuhyun. I mean, whatever, one is the generally accepted romanization, and the other sounds like what they'd call a particularly slimy species of slug.

HANGEUL: 조 규현 (Cho Gyuhyun)
OFFICIAL CHINESE: 曹 圭賢 (Cao Guixian)
TOTALLY UNOFFICIAL CHINESE THAT A BUNCH OF FANS THINK IS CORRECT BUT THAT HE THINKS IS WRONG, DAGNABIT: 趙 奎賢 (Zhao Kuixian)

Fun note: Here is a photo of Kyuhyun telling everyone that Kuixian is NOT HIS NAME. The sign reads "Kuixian" - X "Gui" - O. This is not what I am here to nitpick, however, as it is basically real-life canon that Zhou Mi calls Kyuhyun Kuixian. (Though he actually uses both, and even tends to favor Guixian. BECAUSE -- SURPRISE! -- THAT'S HIS NAME)

So here are some handy-dandy diagrams.





This is the anatomy of Chinese and Korean names. The family name comes first. Then the given name! Sometimes, there are two-character family names, but this is extremely rare (see: Ouyang, Zhuge, Sima). Sometimes, there are one-character given names, but two characters are more common.

From this we can conclude the following.

Family Names: Cho, Cao, Zhao
Given Names: Kyuhyun, Gyuhyun, Kuixian, Guixian (Kyu Hyun, Gyu Hyun, Kui Xian, Gui Xian)



This is Zhou Mi. He's my favorite. He's adorable. They made him look kinda manly in this picture, so he set it as his display photo on weibo. To make up for this uncharacteristic show of masculinity, he set this as his background.

OFFICIAL CHINESE: 周 覓 (Zhou Mi)
HANGEUL: 조 미 (Cho Mi)
UNOFFICIAL KOREAN THAT HE PROBABLY NOT ONLY DOESN'T ANSWER TO, BUT HAS WIPED FROM HIS MEMORY TO MAKE ROOM FOR MORE USELESS FACTS ABOUT DORAEMON: 주 멱 (Joo Myuk)





Zhou Mi has one of those increasingly popular one-character given names. People are not generally used to these types of names, so it's rare and even occasionally rude to refer to someone by their given name if it's only one character long.

Sometimes, friends and family might add a "Xiao" or "Ah" before it, or just double it, e.g. "Mimi." But between coworkers, acquaintances, and strangers (or even friends!), it is 100% normal and acceptable to just refer to people with these types of names by their full name, e.g. "Zhou Mi," even while shortening other people's three-character names into their two-character given name.

So if Zhou Mi and Cho Kyuhyun were both born in China, it would be perfectly reasonable for someone to call Zhou Mi "Zhou Mi" at the same time that he called Kyuhyun "Guixian."

We can conclude, therefore, that as far as Zhou Mi goes:

Family Names: Zhou, Cho
Given Name: Mi


HOW TO TYPE THEIR NAMES


Now, telling someone how they should type a name is ridiculous. I'm not going to demand that you write it Kuixian. That's silly. But I do ask - and this is all I ask -- that you keep things consistent! As in, IN THE SAME FORMAT, WITHIN ONE STORY.

I mean, if you were writing about Hyukjae and Donghae, you wouldn't call one Dong Hae and the other Hyukjae, would you?

Johnsmith and Jane Doe?

Leesungmin, Lee Hyuk Jae, Lee Donghae?

So, if you were to stick to just one of the following formatting groups, that'd be DANDY.

GROUP A
Family Given

Zhou Mi (Cho Mi)
Cho Kyuhyun (Zhao Kuixian)
GROUP B
Family Gi Ven

Zhou Mi (Cho Mi)
Cho Kyu Hyun (Zhao Kui Xian)
GROUP C
Familygiven

Zhoumi (Chomi)
Chokyuhyun (Zhaokuixian)


Or...

Zhou Mi and Kyuhyun and Kuixian
Zhou Mi and Kyu Hyun and Kui Xian
Zhou Mi and Kyuhyun and Kuixian
Zhou Mi and Kyuhyun and Kui Xian

Zhou Mi and Cho Kyuhyun and Zhao Kuixian
Zhoumi and Chokyuhyun and Zhaokuixian
Zhoumi and Cho Kyuhyun and Zhao Kuixian




tl;dr I'M PICKY but this is also kind of important, because while I realize a lot of you don't speak Chinese and Korean, it'd be nice if you kept romanizations reasonably consistent so I don't have to keep wondering why the fuck Kyuhyun ceases to have a last name whenever he's being referred to in Chinese. (Or why it becomes "Kui." Which doesn't MEAN ANYTHING and is used solely to transliterate words like "quinine" into Chinese.)


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